22

It's definitely possible to live with a cat even if you have cat allergies. There are several things you can do to reduce, and remove the allergens that cause a reaction. Step one is always fresh air, ventilation, and filtration. Open windows when you can to get fresh air flow moving through the house, bring in new air and take away the old with dander and ...


21

Oddly enough, it could be the color of their fur. A study has shown that darker color cats are more likely to induce an allergic reaction: While the reason is unclear, researchers at Long Island College Hospital in New York speculate that darker cats may produce more of an allergen called fel d 1 in their skin and saliva than do lighter colored felines. A ...


14

It's absolutely possible - I'm mildly allergic to cats and have three at home. In addition to Matt S's excellent summary, here's a few other things to consider: If you've been able to foster without serious problems, the cat allergy is probably not severe enough to impair your wife's breathing. As long as you keep the house reasonably clean and well-...


7

After this allergy season, my vet offered a suggestion to help prevent the reaction. She suggested wiping the dog down after he comes inside. This will help remove the pollen that is clinging to his fur and not give it a chance to irritate the skin. She suggested keeping a spray bottle of a vinegar/water solution near the door and immediately spray him ...


7

No, it does not appear that anything harmful beyond an allergic reaction takes place. If you search against "Bloodworm allergies", you will find many accounts related by people who have discovered that touching bloodworms (frozen or not) can cause allergic reactions, which is why you should wear gloves when handling them. According to the study, &...


7

It had turned out to be the new detergent that I had bought. I went back to the non-perfumed original detergent and washed everything and his symptoms got better almost overnight.


7

The most conclusive way to discover if you have an allergy or not is to ask your doctor for an allergy test. There are two types, skin based and blood based. The skin based one, they will prick your skin with the suspected allergen, and see if you react. With blood based, they'll draw a blood sample and test that. Free ways to try to test it out, is to ...


6

There are a number of breeds suggested for folks who are mildly allergic. The allergy is usually to a specific protein (fel D1), and breeds differ in how strongly they express this. A websearch for "less allergenic cats" turns up essentially the same list from multiple sources differing mostly in how much additional information they give you about the breeds,...


6

Are you feeding an allergen free food? Start there and give him nothing else. Also cut out use of perfumes in laundry detergent and use around the house until you get this figured out. The vet should be able to give you a steroid that will GREATLY reduce the itching and irritation. It's not a forever solution but should help you get it under control. You can ...


6

When I had a cat with severe (anaphylaxtic shock severe) allergies, we were able to have the vet do a blood test which gave us a list of foods that we had to avoid. It was definitely easier than randomly guessing which food to try next.


6

I suppose it's possible that there's an allergy at play here but I'd be looking for a more likely cause first. Has the cat been checked/treated for fleas? Fleas, mites or ticks can transfer from cats to hamsters and that would certainly cause the scratching behavior you see.


5

The allergens that cause reactions in the allergic are carried on the skin and other places the cat touches with saliva. From what I understand, these allergens tend to be more prevalent in male cats, and some breeds like Siberian have even lower levels for males, and very small in females. I have heard that the use of home air filtration could be of use ...


5

Web-MD for Pets has this list of common cat allergies: The most common food allergens are chicken, fish, corn, wheat, and soy; cats may also develop a food allergy to beef, pork, dairy products, or eggs. If you think your cat has a food allergy, I'd suspect some additive in the food if you're feeding a commercial diet before I'd suspect the meat itself (...


5

Allergic reactions to cats is mostly caused by proteins in saliva, as well as dander. Physical removal is the only solution. This means vacuuming and wet cleaning, mostly. You shouldn't need to use a hot wash. Hand-washing delicate items should be fine. Dry (solvent) cleaning will also work. If the problem persists, you may have to discard certain items. ...


4

Other than avoidance, there may be a few things you can do. One thing that is sometimes recommended is oatmeal, similar to how it is recommended to relieve itching for humans with chicken pox. Grind it to a fine powder, and if the dog allows it, either soak the animal in water mixed with the oatmeal, or rub the animal down (gently!) with a damp cloth and ...


4

In my experience, it's possible to have a mild allergy that doesn't manifest until after a period of time. Typically, "allergy to cats" is actually an allergy to cat dander, saliva, etc. (http://www.webmd.com/allergies/guide/cat-allergies). Allergies can have a large range of severity to the very mild through to severe enough that being in the same house ...


4

Allergies to animals, particularly furry ones, can be across the board rather than species specific. Usually the source of this is dander in the fur and cats, dogs, rabbits, etc. will typically have this and so, yes, it's entirely possible that you'll have the same problem if you get a dog. Allergy symptoms for someone may take a bit of time to develop and ...


4

You have some great answers, but I wanted to warn you, dusting can actually make things worse. While helpful in reducing inadvertence contact with the allergen through touching a dust covers surface, the act of dusting causes dust to be dispersed into the air. The best way to deal with dust it to run a HEPA filter, especially when dusting, and try to ...


4

Poor puppy! I am not a vet, but if this were a human, the first thing I'd do is to put your poor dog on a tapering dose of prednisone (dirt cheap and will help). I would also start a limited course of a topical steroid in the worst places - if he licks, probably a gel (though they tend to be expensive). Benadryl is helpful. If you want to decrease his ...


4

If you don't have access to a friend's cat, you can always visit your local animal shelter and visit the cats there. Cat allergies are usually allergies to the (cat's) saliva on cat fur. If you bury your face in a cat's fur and don't have an allergic reaction, you are probably pretty safe.


4

Sadly its impossible to diagnose skin issues online, it needs to be seen in person. Hot spots (bacterial), fungal, allergies, parasites. Maybe they both came in contact with a chemical. Sometimes you need a longer course of antibiotics than average (you said it was helping but would come back). Can always try getting a second opinion or ideally go to a ...


4

It's almost certainly cat dander, saliva, or urine that you're allergic to, rather than the hair itself. Washing the fabric in hot water should neutralise any of those allergens, and also leave your washing machine free of allergens. Check that the fabric is safe to wash in hot water. As a practical matter, I would make every effort to remove the cat hair ...


4

I 100% agree with Cricket that it's practically impossible to stop the cat fur. For example, even when I brush the cat I can't brush her entire body, and that's when she wants to sit still enough. The unbrushed hair will shed and float around the house. Experience It's really commendable that you are doing research. I strongly recommend learning by doing, ...


4

I suggest you look for freeze dried fish cat treats. Typically fish is the only ingredient. They are somewhat smelly (which for pets is generally a desirable characteristic). It's easy to break into the desired size bits, so you can make it very small bits for regular treats, then use larger bits or some tuna for a 'jackpot treat'. If this doesn't work for ...


4

You need to start by vacuuming any soft surfaces like fabric, carpets, curtains (use a vacuum with a HEPA filter); you might want to leave the windows open to get clean air inside and to get the dust out while vacuuming. Any textiles that you can remove from the apartment need to be washed and dried before you put them back. Next you need to wash all of the ...


3

get exact tests, they are ussually done for free or at very low prices, its often something very simple which appears around the cat, but isnt really an issue with actually having a cat ex. i know few people who though were allergic to cats and were in fact allergic to bentonite (cat toilet sand compund), replacing bentonite with special wood chip or gel ...


3

In humans there are two standard methods: antihistamines "shots" (typically injections of the allergen into the bloodstream, the immune system then recognizes the things (proteins of external origin) are not actually indicating a massive infection. There is the feeling that increase allergies among humans in the developed world is a result of living in too ...


3

What can I do to reduce the amount of bird dander? Make sure that your bird is able to bathe himself. Aside from that, the rest comes down to cleaning, like changing newspaper/cage liners, sweeping, vaccuming, etc. Since your wife is the one allergic, it is best if she does not clean the cage at all, or if she does, to wear a face mask. Reducing the number ...


3

I have used Allerpet on my 2 cats, one longhair. They didn't mind it too much--instead of wiping on as the directions said, I parted hair and sprayed it on, then wiped it with cloth or soft brush or my fingers, which spread it better. Then I would wipe excess off counter by sliding the cats over it. That treatment lasted 2 weeks or more, and cooled and ...


3

Yep! Collars can cause these kinds of irritations, most commonly I see it in dogs that go in the water a lot and get their collars wet. The moisture from the collar can cause yeasty irritations on the skin. Leather also tends to keep moisture in better than nylon. I would remove the collar and wait for the area to heal, once healed try a different kind of ...


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