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For USDAA, the jumps are meant to be at equal or greater height than the dog's shoulders. The goal of the new classes is to try and even the playing field for the many dogs at the low end of the 16" and 22" jump classes. By adding a 14" and 18" jump class, they hope to keep the dogs better matched. More detailed information about the change can be found in ...


4

Variety is the spice of life, even for dogs. Keep her busy and entertained by alternating the types of chew toys she gets every day. Here's a few more options: A Kong Toy - These are super durable rubber toys that are hollow on the inside. You can fill them with a bit of peanut butter or other food, which will keep your dog busy all day. The website has a ...


4

In agility the dog walk, teeter, or A-frame are types of contacts or contact equipment. The yellow at the ends of each designate the area that your dog must touch with at least one foot in order to have completed the obstacle successfully. These rules are in place for the dogs safety to ensure the dogs are not encouraged to jump from high heights on a ...


4

This is my current list and the why on each. I have to thank all the AMAZING agility trainers who have taught me this over the last 10 years! And to all the great students who have helped me find the holes in what I've used. In order to maintain consistent contact performance we must have a routine maintenance package that reinforces all the components of ...


4

You can teach your rabbit Kaninhop the same way you could teach any other animal (like dogs) a new trick: with treats and rewards, but without pressure. First you need an obstacle the rabbit can jump over. It should be light weight and round, like a plastic pipe or paper tube. You can balance it on some small wood blocks or stones or whatever you find lying ...


3

Really important advice... THE GOLDEN RULE... You can teach a dog to treat his or her toys with greater respect. How you ask? If your dog begins to treat the toy with damaging results, remove the toy immediately and place in a visible but inaccessible (to the dog) location for at least 24 hours. After that time has passed and preferably at a similar time ...


2

Training contacts is all about ensuring your dog puts at least one foot in the yellow at both ends of an obstacle and to ensure safe performance of the obstacles. The contact zones are the yellow areas and are a specific depth designed to prevent the dog from jumping from an unsafe height. Giving all the details would be a small book but I'll try to give ...


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The best method I've used so far is the 2x2 method that Susan Garrett came up with. You can find the details here https://www.clickerdogs.com/2x2_weave_training.php In the past I've used wires, cages, and "the weave pole dance" but those methods have taken much longer to train and I think that the entries are especially strong with the 2x2 system compared ...


2

According to page 25 of http://www.asca.org/Portals/0/AgilityRules.pdf If the dog or handler has previously earned a Regular Agility Standard – Novice (RS-N) title, a Gamblers Agility Standard – Novice (GS-N) title, or a Jumpers Agility Standard – Novice (JS-N) title or any of the equivalents from any international style agility association, then ...


1

It sounds like your dog has become "ring-wise" and developed a habit based on something that happens only while at a trial. The most common form of this is poor 2-on-2-off performance because in a trial handlers are so focused on getting that Q that they let their criteria slide which leads to broken stays, but only in a trial. Dogs are very smart and can ...


1

In short, you probably don't need to worry about it. But to explain why: We use a acronym called DASH for training that means Desire Accuracy Speed Habitat. First you build the desire for doing the job. Once you have strong desire you start building accuracy. Once you have about 80% accuracy only then do you worry about speed. The last one, Habitat, means ...


1

How about 'just teach her a "wait"' to be taught and used in any kind of situation as a stopp signal (you will need to train another signal for running on) and if ready, when she is doing fine already with it without leash from any kind of speed and emotional state, transfer it to the obstacles? As a stop you might want to ask for in competition is ...


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