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Please help and share your ideas/experience! It is hard to keep my cat inside, he is literally begging to let him go. But he is a real hunter... Rabbits, birds, chipmunks - he eats them all. I hate this. He eats well at home, but hunter's instinct prevail. I put 2 ring bells on him, not sure it helps, but at least other animals can be warned somehow. Any suggestions are appreciated, even obvious ones. Somewhat related: Is it possible for a cat to run down a wild rabbit and kill it?

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    Classic solution is indeed to bell the cat, though some cats learn to muffle the bells. Not letting the cat go outside is another viable option; mine are allowed onto the fully- screened porch but not fully outside and seem content with this compromise. – keshlam Apr 5 '15 at 2:19
  • @keshlam I've considered this option (screened porch). It definitely would work for many cats, but not for my little rogue. Thanks for the input! – TT_ Apr 5 '15 at 2:32
  • What about some ultrasound device which would warn other animals (kind of "ultrasound bell")? Is there exist something like this? – TT_ Jul 10 '15 at 23:20
  • Anything they will hear, you'd cat will also hear and be annoyed about. – keshlam Jul 10 '15 at 23:23
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    Invisible fence is less likely to work on cats than dogs, since cats climb. And it doesn't keep other critters out of the zone you have allowed the cat into. Frankly, if that's what you are considering, you might just want to keep the cat indoors... or give up, recognize that you adopted a predator and that hunting is a legitimate form of lay for them, and learn to cope. – keshlam Jul 12 '15 at 3:03
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My cat also went through a stage (of about 5 years) where she caught and killed everything in our garden and brought it home. The only thing that worked was to tire her out by playing games with toys and a laser pointer during the evening before bed. Then she was too tired to go out and her passion for hunting was also satisfied with the toys. It was hard work (because if I didn't do it she'd be out hunting again) but it was better than waking up in the dead of night to pick up tiny carcases. So, I advise purchasing some toys (the ones with the feather on the end of a string/stick work the best from experience, or a laser pointer) and exercise your cat every day to tire him out.

  • Thanks! I did not think about tiring him out. We play of course, but probably not enough. I'll try this. – TT_ Apr 8 '15 at 14:31
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Id like to add a bit about whats been discussed in the comments, there is really not a lot you can do other than tire the cat out. if you put a bell on him he will probably do exactly the same as my old cat make a wonderful sound when hes wandering around but the moment its time to hunt lock down his chin on the bell and make his approach. The only difference it made is you could hear it jingle every time he hit his prey.

Also the other answering yelling at the cat is the worst possible choice, the cat is bring you the food because it loves you a lot and wants to help take care of you, yelling at it for doing this will defiantly offend your cat and it certainly won't understand why. the only difference it will make is the cat will bury its excessive prey instead of bringing it to you; well and it will also think your an a**hole.

  • Did you have any experience with invisible fence? Just thinking... – TT_ Jul 17 at 19:24
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When you catch your cat with a animal in its mouth yell at them and take away what the animal they caught this has worked for me with 2 cats after chased and yelled at them for it they stopped.

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    Did they stop killing animals and birds, or did they stop showing you that they killed something? The behavior that you changed might not be what you think it is. – James Jenkins May 29 '18 at 9:46

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