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Around an hour ago I came down stairs to find my Male and Female(Siblin's) Lhasa Apso (aged around 7 months old) "locked" / "Tied" together, My female is currently in heat and although we are ensuring they are supervised as much as possible on this occasion they were not being watched.

Myself and my partner ensured they remained calm as we allowed them to become unlocked.

We are now in a situation which I am unfamiliar with and I was hoping for some feedback/advice on the following:

1) I have read that pregnancy in young dogs carries increased complications and raises the risk of fatality considerably, this obviously is something we want to prevent, I presume our decision to not continue the pregnancy is the only option in preventing these risks?

2) I am unsure how long they were locked, although we suspect only 3-4 mins before we found them and then an additional 10 mins while we were holding them waiting for him to unlock, are the chances of pregnancy decreased by this lower duration?

3) I have looked into an injection branded(in the UK) MisMate (Alizin) does anyone have any experience with this? I heard its success rate is close to 100% if administered early(22 days)

4) I have also read that it is possible to get Her spayed during pregnancy causing it to be ended, However I heard it also carries increased risk? I Presume she can't be spayed while still in season, won't she be close to due date by the time she is able to be spayed?

Does anyone else have any other advice? We consider ourself good dog owners, The male dog is in fact booked in to be neutered on Monday! We wish to protect both the dogs from as much risk to health as possible.

Thanks in advanced.

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    Ask vet, not us. There is nothing you can do which doesn't involve the vet except trust that the dogs' genetics aren't too bad and let her bear the puppies, and the vet can tell you what the real risks of inbreeding are in a particular breed which will help you make that decision rationally. . That's assuming pregnancy results. It may not. – keshlam Feb 7 '15 at 16:35
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    Hi, Many thanks for your reply, I should of noted that I fully intend to raise all these concerns with my vet at the soonest opportunity, however the vet is closed until Monday and in an attempt to evaluate my options I have turned to here for advice. – tornup Feb 7 '15 at 16:40
  • Nothing needs to be done right now. Wait until you have facts to work with. – keshlam Feb 7 '15 at 19:16
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    Thanks for your questions. Could you please break them up into separate questions. It helps other people find your questions easier, which means a better chance at getting answers for you. – Spidercat Feb 8 '15 at 0:06
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    Hello and welcome to Pets.SE! It's best here to use a single page ("question") for each individual thing you want answers to (the numbered items). Please use the "edit" link to erase all but one question here and use the "Ask Question" link in the top right to open new questions for each additional bullet. You can read more about why we've found this method works to get you the best answers in "Why is it better to ask all of my questions separately and not all at once?" – Zaralynda Feb 8 '15 at 7:00
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As stated on the website someone else referred you to, "There is no home care for undesired matings." There are "morning after" treatments, but they need to be administered by vet. So talking to your vet really is the place to start.

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spaying a bitch which is on heat will cause her to breed excessively and not easy to control the loss of blood. A dog will show you enough signs that it is coming in to heat period that's when you take precaution by isolating it from the males.

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    I don't see how this answers the (multiple) questions asked (which is why the OP was asked to separate the questions) – CGCampbell Jan 8 '17 at 15:43

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