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When I got her from the shelter it looked like she had a scab on the side of her pad, but when I checked I saw that her full pad was there and it came off easily. Her toe is very thick and hard to move, and her claw is thick and doesn't retract. When I touch it she doesn't seem to be in pain, and she uses her scratching post and it doesn't hurt her, so I'm curious if I need to take her to the vet or not.

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    it is a bit hard to see exactly what is wrong,i can see something is clearly wrong with the toe and claw but it is hard to say what.i think a vet should take a look at it as it looks like something is wrong at the root of the claw. – trond hansen May 25 at 4:53
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    I'll second that you sadly managed to focus all seven photos on something other than the paw itself and should replace them all with one that's in focus if possible. If the claw is out and Yvette's answer is mistaken, it does seem to look something like the kitty nail fungus that is common on the street cats here in Shanghai. You would be best served taking the cat to a vet, though, since they should be able to fix it up or alleviate your worries pretty quickly. – lly May 25 at 13:19
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    thanks guys for your help!! in a few weeks we take her to the vet to get her second round of shots and we plan on getting her all fixed up!! – Courtney Luzader May 25 at 14:50
  • @lly would you consider posting your comment into an answer? – Yvette May 25 at 20:30
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It looks - and this is a tentative analysis from the internet photos - like an injury that has caused the opening to the claw to become blocked with scar tissue.

It would be worthwhile getting a vet to check this out. It may be something that will resolve, but it may also need a vet to cut out some scar tissue or possibly apply some cream to reopen or enlarge the slit in the pad to allow the claw to retract.

Let us know how you get on.

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    If he doesn't go to the vet and it doesn't resolve biologically, could a blocked claw port cause things like an infection later on? – Nzall May 25 at 14:01
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    @Nzall I'm not a vet, I suspect the nail would need to be removed if it got to that point. I'm not sure, I'd have to research it. – Yvette May 25 at 20:31
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    @Nzall - if it isn't scar tissue, then it is an infection. I don't like what I'm seeing next to the pad. Keep an eye on it, and watch for changes in it physically and behaviorally (any changes are when you take it to the vet, no mater what this or any other problem is, ever). Scheduled for the vet in two weeks, I'd wait it out... unless I saw changes. – Mazura May 26 at 3:26
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I wouldn't wait for a couple of weeks for a vet to look at her/his nail. The nail might be painful for her/him. She/he could have an ingrown toenail and if it gets infected, then you'll need an antibiotic.

I had a cat that had a toenail start growing in the paw pad. We needed a wash for her and antibiotics, so you should take your cat to the vet as soon as possible. I'm sure you don't want your kitten to be in pain.

Good luck with your visit.

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My bet is her toe got broken, healed a bit to the side. Likely the tendon that retracts the claw was damaged. As she's not in pain and it doesn't affect her quality of life, I would leave well enough alone. When you take her for her kitten shots, let the vet examine it. Looks great to me: my girl, who was declawed, had a tag of tissue on one toe similar in looks to you little ones. It eventually (at age 6 or 7) fell off by itself. I therefore think you are in the clear.

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  • Mine also has a sideways toe, but it's the part about the OP's not retracting I'd be concerned about. My vet offered to break it again to straighten it out. I declined. – Mazura May 26 at 3:37
  • the claw not retracting might lead to the kitten injuring you (or others) inadvertently. Cats often tap others playfully with their paws without intending to cause injury... but a claw which is locked open (the kitten might not even realize that it's extended) might lead to unintended consequences. – vsz May 26 at 5:19

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