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I should explain my situation. I grew up on a farm, and I have a great deal of experience with animals. Having had chickens, cows, a horse, dozens of dogs, and a lot of cats, I feel as if I am prepared for a bird. I strayed away from getting birds because they're extremely smart—smart animals are a pain—some of whom live equally long as humans, and they're very vocal.

My ideal bird is a raven, but I refuse to get one for the obvious reason that they're virtually unmanageable under normal circumstances.

I want a bird that is no larger than a Cockatoo.

Given that I am an experienced pet owner, but completely inexperienced with birds (please pay more attention to the latter than the former), what sort of birds are appropriate for me?

I don't want to be a bad pet owner, and I feel as if it's rather easy to screw up owning a bird. They seem very sensitive.

Edit: I feel as if I should say this because I am sure it will be asked: I have all of the time in the world to spend with my bird. My job is as a writer and I make a decent amount of money. I can afford the time and money for most birds. So, it will not be an issue that, say, a Cockatoo will require a great deal of attention.

  • One last question: how much room to you have for "bird-exclusive" space? Do you have a room, space for a large enclosure, or a place where it may even be reasonable for the bird to have free reign around your work-space while you are there? – Layna Apr 14 '18 at 20:34
  • My house is pretty much fine in general, but I do have a spare bedroom that could mostly be used for the bird. And I certainly have room for a large bird cage. I'm mostly concerned with a bird that's less easy to screw up, without some of the more wild issues found in, say, a raven—e.g., ravens will completely destroy a house out of boredom, and are frequent biters. – user31078 Apr 14 '18 at 21:03
  • There are no beginner birds - for example if you are to get a budgie you will still not be prepared for a cockatoo. Are there any specific species you were interested in? – Rebecca RVT Apr 15 '18 at 15:36
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Your answer in not on the internets, stranger.

Please look up your local bird breeders or the like. Go and have a chat with them instead. They will know a lot about the care, time and money involved in keeping birds. Ask them questions, look around, get a feel for how it's done.

Oh, and do check out the local laws about what kind of birds you are allowed to keep. Ravens are awesome, but you already know it's probably better not to have one as a pet.

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