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I have a 2 years old cat that likes playing cat and mouse with me and my girlfriend. If I walk from my bedroom to my living room, he gets playful and he chases me and tries to grab my leg with a soft bite, and after that he runs away and excepts me to run for him.

When playing with my girlfriend, he sometimes meows loudly at her. It sounds like he's angry because she catches him, but right after she stops he'll come back and provoke her to start an other playful fight.

Right now we don't understand if he gets really angry while playing or if he's meowing because he's excited to play. In other situation, he's not a really talkative cat.

What do you think of it ?

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cats do not want to be held against their will and can be quite vocal if one do so,but in your situation the cat probably want your girlfriend to let him go quicker so he can keep playing.

so in a way the cat is sending mixed signals it want to be caught but do not wish to be held.

it is probably an element of your cat training your girlfriend how to play in this,cats are very good at training their people.

if a cat is angry you will know it it will often cause some pain to the person the cat is angry at.

if a cat do yell it is often a warning to stop what you are doing or else he will hurt you.

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When playing with my girlfriend, he sometimes meows loudly at her. It sounds like he's angry because she catches him, but right after she stops he'll come back and provoke her to start an other playful fight.

Right now we don't understand if he gets really angry while playing or if he's meowing because he's excited to play. In other situation, he's not a really talkative cat.

Meowing can be a way for your cat to incentivize others to play with him. This is the case for our youngest, an incessantly playful male.

His sisters are less energetic than him. The first few months, he would play with them by pouncing on them. The girls never liked it. If he kept doing it, they would eventually angrily chase him off. But about 1 times in 10, one of the girls would actually play with him because they were in the mood.

Over time, he learned that pouncing on the girls before he knew whether they were in a playful mood would not be a good bet; he'd be chased away more than getting played with.
He developed a new tactic: he would run into the room, run straight up to one of the cats, meow in their face, and then run away. He would repeat this process about five times. If they never chased him, he tried it with the other cat, and then tried it with us.

Months later, he has now resorted to simply running around the house, meowing loudly whenever he wants to play (he seems to pretend to be wounded, based on how he meows). But the pattern is always the same: he frantically runs, stops, meows, and then runs off again. And you can really see him check if anyone is looking at him while he does it.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with him, he just wants someone to chase him (so he can then chase them).


The same may be true for your cat. Maybe he initially tried to start playtime by puncing on you guys, but you responded less welcomingly than he liked (totally understandable for you to not like getting clawed out of nowhere).
So instead, he is resorting to a different way of starting playtime, one which does not give him negative feedback.

Especially since he expects you to chase him; it seems very reminiscent of what my cat is trying to achieve. The meowing is essentially playfult taunting ("catch me if you can").

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