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I will be living in a second floor apartment in a stand-alone house. Is it possible to have a cat there with me, who is used to going outside to hunt and explore? I'm concerned because I wouldn't know when she's ready to come back in again.

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    i think we need more information,is there any place where a cat can get up to the second floor,a balcony or some small roof,can somthing be made too give the cat access to the apartment. – trond hansen Sep 1 '17 at 6:38
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    I've seen people here who attach wooden "stairs" to the outside wall of the house to let the cat in through their balcony like this: google.de/…: however, that's probably an invitation to burglars and everyone in the house would have to agree with putting them up – Sambovi Sep 1 '17 at 15:12
  • @Sambovi i hope you are takig about a (cat)burglar.. but seriously some more information had been nice. – trond hansen Sep 2 '17 at 15:22
  • @trondhansen I'm not quite sure what you're aiming at? I literally mean people breaking into your home cause it's easy to get up to the 2nd floor on those stairs? – Sambovi Sep 2 '17 at 16:04
  • @Sambovi - Please post an answer including your favorites from this great collection of images. You've really opened up my thinking, thanks. – aparente001 Sep 2 '17 at 16:07
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For starters, I have never owned a cat so I'm not experienced in this field but there are a lot of cats in my area. I have seen quite some people who attach wooden stairs to the outside wall of their houses to let the cats in through a window or balcony. Here are some examples of what that could look like: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

There are several of these that you can buy online. I found quite a few on eBay starting at about 20 euros for where I am. (Search for cat stairs/cat ladder outside)

According to Trond Hansen you can put cat flaps into glass as well. So this might be a practical solution for both, you and your cat because the cat could go in and out on his/her own terms.

Potential issues that I see in this:

  • Burglars. The stairs could be used to climb up to the second floor. I'd personally prefer a rather hidden solution because of this. (Like the one in picture 3)

  • Everyone in the house would have to agree with this. Make sure to ask before you settle on this solution.

  • there is always some risk for burglars to gain acsess but this can be limited by several types of locking equipment one can buy.and the risk depends on where one lives. – trond hansen Sep 2 '17 at 20:30
  • @trondhansen That's a good constructive way to phrase this. Thank you. Feel free to suggest an edit on the cat flap part if you have additional information on that. – Sambovi Sep 3 '17 at 6:11
  • i dont have more informatio on the catflap mounted in the glass door it was just somthing i did see at a house some years ago it was mounted on a balcony door. – trond hansen Sep 3 '17 at 6:30
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It depends on the configuration of the house. My sister once lived in a second floor apartment and her door was external (she climbed a set of stairs and THEN entered the house). A situation like that could have worked (especially if there was a screen or storm door so you could leave the heavy front door open).

If there's not any way for a cat to access your front door or a window, then likely not.

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    a catflap can be mounted many places including glass doors(whith proffesional help). – trond hansen Sep 2 '17 at 15:29
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When we lived on the 3rd floor of an apartment building, we got our cat up and down the balcony using a basket on a rope. At first we used treats to lure it into the basket and then roped it up and down. After a while it understood how that "elevator service" worked. The cat meowed near the basket when it wanted outside and meowed below the balcony when it wanted us to pull it up.

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