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I got a 3-month-old golden retriever puppy and he is very friendly. I am living in a city and I don't know much about people around.

I want the puppy to be comfortable with people so that he doesn't express aggressiveness or jumping behavior towards my guest.

So, I take my pup outside my home at late hours; however, when my neighbours or strangers pass by, they play with him. I am afraid this will make him to consider them as friendly (I am also irritated when strangers come, play and pat him since he is only a pup).

Any idea how to make him comfortable without befriending people while training?

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Is there anything wrong getting to know your neighbors?

As for strangers, don't worry too much. The whole "come on, let's play!" excitement will become far less noticeable over time.

It's essentially a "puppy thing".

One of our dogs - a Siberian Husky - always has been overexcited when he saw other people or dogs. He'd be unstoppable, trying to go after them to have a look, scream, etc.

While growing up this behavior toned down significantly. Now, three years later it's pretty much non-existent for total strangers. The only exception are people he considers part of the pack (like people from our small street).

Also just to note: Especially with many strangers around you don't want your dog to consider them hostile in any way. This can and will cause problems. There's nothing wrong in your dog expecting some petting. As a puppy it will get overexcited etc. but as mentioned this will be temporary. Also this won't cause it to suddenly accept strangers trying to steal from your home or similar things. For dogs there's a difference on how and where you meet others.

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  • @Selva just adding: Feel free to try to correct unwanted behavior, like crossing streets. Just avoid a "strangers are bad"paradigm.
    – Mario
    May 8 '17 at 7:58
  • I really like that comment on how there is a difference between a dog meeting people with the owner, than if someone was to enter the home when the owner is away (to steal things). Plus the intruder is entering the dog's territory. Also golden retrievers are not by nature aggressive dogs.
    – user6796
    May 8 '17 at 19:08

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