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I have a three-month dog. He's been with me about 3 weeks. My wife is allergic, so we avoid him to getting into home. Also, we are concerned about hygiene. We don't think it's a good idea dogs being inside home, however he has a very big area outside home.

Now, every time someone opens the kitchen's door, he wants to get in. At first, when I said "Go out!", he stopped. However, now the dog doesn't obey anymore. He really wants to be inside.

He tries to go inside by crawling. It's funny actually. It's kind of that he thinks I'm not seeing him. I have to push him otherwise he will get in.

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    The crawling is a submissive behavoir. He is not thinking he's invisible! It communicates that he wants to cross some else's territory but not “invade” it or compete. – JDługosz Mar 23 '17 at 9:39
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Of course he wants to come inside - that is where you are!

Dogs need the company of their family - especially if he is your only dog keeping him alone outside is quite cruel. Dogs are pack animals after all.

1) If you really cannot keep him inside the home because of the allergy, and only want one dog, just find him a new home. It is fine, really! For both you and the dog that is the best in the long run.

2) You have a puppy - do pamper him a bit! Dogs are fully grown up when they are about 2-3 years old. Right now he has to learn everything - who you are, where he lives how to communicate with dogs, with you, with cats, postmen, etc. He won't learn that in a way that satisfies you if you do not guide him. And guiding a puppy is more or less a full time job for the first 6 months. You wont be able to teach him everything he needs to learn unless you move outside for most of the day, to spend time with him.

3) This seems to be your first dog, I would recommend reading up an a dogs body language. This is his main way to communicate with you, and you need to be able to understand what he is saying in order to train him.

4) Your dog will at most have the intellect of a two year old. Keep that in mind when communicating. I find training with the clicker method the easiest to make myself understood, and especially young dogs love it.

5) Concerning hygiene - dogs do clean themselves, and a healthy dog is no health risk whatsoever. Getting a dog houseclean is some work, and there will be accidents in the house, but unless you plan on licking the pee and not washing your hands after cleaning up, there is no health risk.

6) Concerning the allergies: I am allergic to animals myself, also my dogs, so I know this can be annoying when handling them. We got a breed that looses little fur, so this is not so much of an issue. However, only your wife really knows how bad her allergy gets. If she gets asthmatic around the dogs, I would recommend re-homing the little guy. If it is only slight itching of the skin, she has to decide if she wants to put up with that. Since the allergens are in the saliva of the dog, it is rather easy to handle. After interacting with the dog, just wipe down the parts you got in contact with, with clear water. But again - I think she needs to be ok with this. I know how annoying having a pet with an allergy against it can be. And 10 to 15 years is a long time to live with an animal you are allergic too, and wont work if she is not on board with it.

Hope this helps. Let me now if you have questions.

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Dogs are domesticated pack animals and like to be with people. If you want your dog to be a happy and well-behaved pet, rather than an unhappy guard dog, you should perhaps look at re-homing him.

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I agree with the other post. Dogs are pack animals and need interaction for their cues and rules. Yours is just a baby. He's probably scared and lonely. I don't know what pleasure he can be to you this way and certainly he is particularly unhappy as it sounds like he has separation anxiety which another dog may not have. But please consider rehoming him. If your pet cannot enter the house it would be best to not have one. They are family members and desire that time and activity level. This doesn't sound like a good end result for either of you.

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  • I will try to convice my wife. We are afraid of him destroying things or pee inside home. I thought that playing with him three times a day and walking with him(I'll walk with after third vaccine) would be enough. – Murilo Mar 22 '17 at 11:27
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At that age, the dog needs to be with you and other people. Like, put a 6-foot leash on your belt and keep him beside you at all times. He needs constant companionship and hugs as well as a good amount of attention.

He probably came from a home where he slept in a pike with his littermates and was surrounded by other dogs and people. Being alone is torture. Knowing you're there is maddening.

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I have a different opinion than the other answers. Dogs may be domesticated animals but they want to be able to be outside. The best thing would be to keep him outside but spend quality time with him every day. I feel good that my dog is outside in the garden being able to run and pee whenever he wants. I can also understand though, his need to be with his pack (you in this case). Spend a lot of time with him, play with him and take him for regular walks and he will be fine. Also when the weather permits, take your laptop or your book and go sit outside with him. He will feel great!

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  • I sat outside yesterday while using my laptop. I will take him for walkings next month when he will have the third vaccine taken. – Murilo Mar 23 '17 at 14:18

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