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We adopted Tony (dog in picture) from a local shelter over a year ago. We have had very little luck improving his behavior in any category. If he's loose in the house more than 5 minutes, supervised or unsupervised, he's peeing on the walls or pooping on the floor even if he's just come and and done all of his business outside. He is 120% hyper at all times and in his mind he must be in your face or jumping on you trying to get there.

He can't go on a leash because he has slipped every collar and harness we've put on him including choke chains and probably because of past abuse he is fear aggressive to other people and animals. We weren't told of this when we adopted him and it didn't come out until he bonded with us. I am at a loss. If you offer him treats, he'll take it once or twice and then he's not interested anymore. Praise just means he needs to lick your face off. For the jumping we've looked for rain, we've kneed him, we've told him no - all things that have worked with prior dogs - and absolutely no change. He knows he's supposed to potty outside and absolutely won't go in his crate. He was about 2 years old when he was fixed - after we adopted him. I'm just not sure where to go from here.

I've read other posts that say there is SOMETHING that motivates him, but after about a year and a half the only thing I've seen him respond to is whatever his little doggy brain tells him is a good idea.

It's frustrating because this isn't my first dog. I'm 50 and have had dogs since I was a toddler. I just never have had one that didn't care if I was happy with them.

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You absolutely need to find a trainer, like a GOOD trainer for one on one sessions. The aggressive issues are a huge concern.

he's peeing on the walls or pooping on the floor even if he's just come and and done all of his business outside

Stress and anxiety can do this to a dog, some dogs will do this after their owners leave - they are upset. Also with his previous situation he may have been house soiling the entire time, it will be harder to break. Have you tried motivating him with play?

He is 120% hyper at all times and in his mind he must be in your face or jumping on you trying to get there

You have a high energy dog with high energy needs - this is the type of dog that will need 1 hour or more exercise in the morning and evening, he needs to be tuckered out. This will also help with your house soiling problems. A friend of mine has a blue heeler, now this is an active breed. Every morning at 5 am they go to the park for 1 hour of strenuous exercise, in the evenings and weekends (each activity on different days) they do fly ball, dock diving (watersports), agility and disc dog. Here's a list of activities to look for ideas. Another option if you live a busy lifestyle is to hire someone to do these activities with your dog. Another thing to keep him busy is buying puzzle food bowls and toys where he needs to use his brain to get the kibble inside.

He can't go on a leash because he has slipped every collar and harness we've put on him including choke chains.

Choke/prong chains aren't very reliable and can cause damage to the neck, in general I prefer the use of body harnesses or gentle leaders - though I have a sneaky suspicion that he won't tolerate a gentle leader. Have you tried the harness that clicks from the front? I don't see how he could get out of it unless he snaps the clip.

we've kneed him

Please do not hit him, there are much better ways to train a dog - especially one that comes from an abusive home, this is an absolute no-no. He needs positive training and confidence boosting.

absolutely won't go in his crate

This is a tough one and why I encourage crate training as a puppy, though obviously not your fault a way around this would be to get a dog sitter or bring him to a doggy daycare where he could have a room to himself. I know you mentioned he's fear aggressive so this will have to be done in baby steps, make it a positive experience.

Edit: something extra I thought of, when doing training do it prior to breakfast and supper. A hungry dog is going to be food motivated, unless they are finicky eaters.

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