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My 8 year old Japanese Chin, Pekingese cross has these recurrent eye infections which respond to oral antibiotics and prednisone. We've had to use oral medications as we haven't been able to apply eye ointments or drops. Unfortunately we didn't fully train his bite inhibition so he will try and bite if we attempt to apply the medications.

The vet sold us a muzzle but it doesn't work. It covers his eyes so that we can't get to them to treat topically.

I've added pictures of his face so you can see the problem. He has a very flat face.

Comet

Comet 2

So any suggestions on how I can apply the treatment without losing a finger?

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For nippy dogs it's definitely a two person job. We will sometimes place an e-collar - one person will hold his head up while he other aims the drops from up high into the eyes. The e-collar helps prevent him from being able to bite us during restraint.

You can also book appointments for technicians to do this for you as well.

Always reward at then end of treatment.

Adding from comments:

I took a few shots with the owners consent on her little bichon frise. imgur.com/a/HiIza

The burrito is most commonly seen on cats but it works on small dogs too. Takes practice, I'm hoping someone at your regular vet can show you first hand or do it for you.

I would youtube kitty burrito so that you can visually see how it's done, the last fold you do goes between your hips and the table while your hands hold the head

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  • Don't understand. How do you hold the head in place? You push through the e-collar? Jul 12 '16 at 10:27
  • One person has hands behind head and through the dogs collars, arms restrain body from each side. I'm at work now, I'll see if I can snap a picture of the restraint for you once our patients start rolling in. Jul 12 '16 at 10:49
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    Something else I thought of is to wrap him in a towel, like a burrito, and only allow his head to pop out. You'll have better restraint that way as well if the e-collar is too stressful. Some dogs are OK with us putting the e-collar on but won't let us touch their faces. Jul 12 '16 at 11:04
  • @Rrebeccatvt's solution is commonly used with struggling cats -- and they've got claws as well as teeth to worry about.
    – keshlam
    Jul 12 '16 at 13:07
  • I took a few shots with the owners consent on her little bichon frise. imgur.com/a/HiIza Keshlam is right about it most commonly seen on cats but it works on small dogs too. Takes practice, I'm hoping someone at your regular vet can show you first hand or do it for you. I would youtube kitty burrito so that you can visually see how it's done, the last fold you do goes between your hips and the table while youre hands hold the head. Jul 12 '16 at 16:02

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