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I know this is broad question but I am thinking about adopting a kitten soon. However I started thinking about two for their welfare. However my parents, who live on another side of the world, are a bit terrified:

  • Their experience with two cats in single household is that it ends with violence, including sexual, between cats when they grow up even when they were fine as kittens.
  • They are a little bit worried about problems with travelling (I don't want to tell them that but I hate travelling and even with one cat I planned to ask a friend to see him/her rather then introduce a cat to stress of international travel).
  • They are also worried that, as I am single at this moment, I may have a trouble finding significant other.
  • They don't buy the argument about kittens playing with each other when I'm away at work as they think that a single one will just sleep through the day.

What should I do? Are they right? Is there any negative stereotype about singles with two cats (I'm currently in Western US)? Is my rented flat (<900 ft sq) too small for 2 cats?

PS. Cats would be of course sprayed/neutered (already by shelter I believe) and stay-at-home.

  • Get littermates if possible. My two are nine years old this week; they have always been pals. At the moment we're living in half your space! – Anton Sherwood Jun 16 at 1:49
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Their experience with two cats in single household is that it ends with violence, including sexual, between cats when they grow up even when they were fine as kittens.

As with most animals: If there aren't any problems in training or regarding health issues etc. multiple cats will get along nicely. Ever heard of full prides of lions? ;) Of course there can be the occasional playing and fighting, but at times we've had three cats at the same time (two male, one female; all neutered) and no problems except the occassional "I want there! No I want! Nah, my place! No! Let's fight!".

They are a little bit worried about problems with travelling (I don't want to tell them that but I hate travelling and even with one cat I planned to ask a friend to see him/her rather then introduce a cat to stress of international travel).

Definitely, try avoiding unnecessary trips, especially longer ones.

They are also worried that, as I am single at this moment, I may have a trouble finding significant other.

As mentioned in the comments. I'm not sure where your parents are from, but apart from phobias or allergies, do you (and they) really think anyone would avoid you just for having cats? Well, as long as you're not like the crazy cat lady from The Simpsons.

They don't buy the argument about kittens playing with each other when I'm away at work as they think that a single one will just sleep through the day.

Spoiler alert: Both would most likely just sleep apart from occasional playing, they have a point there.


Either way, don't make that decision based on what others say or think of you. Considerg how much time and space you have for your pets (if you've got multiple cats they should have a chance to be physically separated for a bit, e.g. at least two rooms) and often ignored how much money you have for them. You not only have to buy more food, you'll also have higher veterinarian bills, etc.

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    "Their experience with two cats in single household is that it ends with violence, including sexual" - Your parents are probably thinking of animals that are "intact" (aren't neutered or spayed). You definitely should have the kittens neutered or spayed when you get them, if it hasn't already been done. – mhwombat Jun 27 '16 at 16:59
  • "Spoiler alert: Both would most likely just sleep apart from occasional playing, they have a point there." This has not been my experience; kittens are definitely more active than adult cats and will play with each other, or wreak havoc when left alone. – Allison C Jun 15 at 14:37
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Their experience with two cats in single household is that it ends with violence, including sexual, between cats when they grow up even when they were fine as kittens.

Not to discount your parents' experience, but in my own, I have never observed that--and I can almost guarantee my family (being rural-based and therefore needing multiple "working cats" as well as having a large number of "house cats") has gone through far more cats than they have. Intact males and females will mate, and to a human it may seem "violent," but that's just the nature of feline mating. Desexed cats who grow up together, absent any stimuli that might drive them apart, will continue to be just fine with each other as they age.

They are a little bit worried about problems with travelling (I don't want to tell them that but I hate travelling and even with one cat I planned to ask a friend to see him/her rather then introduce a cat to stress of international travel).

Avoid travel with a cat unless it's necessary. Cats are not dogs, and generally don't care for travel. They prefer to stick to their home territory, and take much longer to settle into a new situation than dogs.

They are also worried that, as I am single at this moment, I may have a trouble finding significant other.

This is the silliest excuse for not getting a pet that I've ever seen. Anyone who would be "turned off" by two cats will be similarly "turned off" by one cat, and in my opinion, isn't worth your time.

They don't buy the argument about kittens playing with each other when I'm away at work as they think that a single one will just sleep through the day.

Many rescues recommend taking two kittens instead of one, particularly bonded pairs of kittens, because kittens are higher energy than adult cats and do, in fact, play with each other during the day. A single kitten, on the other hand, will find whatever it can to play with, and this will potentially lead to household destruction. A bonded pair of kittens (whether siblings or otherwise) will do a great job of keeping each other occupied, and while they may still find mischief to get into (my pair learned to work together to control my thermostat!), it's considerably less than what a single kitten gets into (I had to keep my singleton in a borrowed dog crate to keep her from destroying my bedroom).

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