My dog were very sick the past weeks, he was diagnosed with canine distemper, now he seems to be good, I mean that he is acting as usual, he's happy, playing with us and eating, but he still have secretion in his eyes and very rarely in his nose. We took them to the vet just to check if he's now ok, but she told us that he will never be healthy, because this virus has no cure. I want to now if that's true?

  • @cobaltduck I've been looking on google and I didn't found a reliable source, I'll talk to some other vet just to have a second opinion, I ask here to know if anyone had a similar case. – laviku Apr 5 '16 at 18:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

No. There is no disease that has "no cure." (unless you were born with something like down syndrome and such.) People often say "It has no cure." What this really means is that they just can't cure it themselves. There is no saying your dog won't get over it by himself. Just because humans don't have a cure for it, doesn't mean it's incurable. This is kind of a bad example: Take for instance Ebola. It has "no cure" yet some people got over it themselves. Just because you got it doesn't mean you couldn't cure it. It just means that humans don't have something that will take it away for you. I'm not saying you dog will get over it for sure, i'm just saying that he might. Let's hope for the best. Good luck.

  • Half of modern medicine consists of supporting the patient and controlling the symptoms while the body deals with the problem. Viruses especially; we can make vaccines against some, and there are expensive antiviral drugs which address some others, but curing an established case of a viural disease is mostly waiting for the body to make antibodies and keeping the symptoms from damaging the patient in the meantime. – keshlam Apr 5 '16 at 23:48
  • Exactly! Thank you for realizing that too! – GoldNugget8 Apr 6 '16 at 2:23
  • I actually knew a person who's brother had a "0%" chance of living from his disease and he fell into a coma for 14 days. Then he woke up. When he woke up, he was perfectly fine. His body had fought whatever he had off. He returned home that day. – GoldNugget8 Apr 6 '16 at 2:24
  • Statistics always have outliers.... but don't bet more on them than you can afford to lose, since that's the probable outcome. Better to be wrong and delighted... – keshlam Apr 6 '16 at 2:28
  • True, very true. But also don't dwell on the fact that it probably won't be cured. Look on the bright side and know it might get cured. – GoldNugget8 Apr 6 '16 at 2:48

There is no known cure but I believe I helped my dog with Distemper with Vitamin A.

Apparently Distemper is similar to Measles. Measles can be treated in children with Vitamin A.

vitamin A megadoses (200,000 international units (IUs) on each day for two days) lowered the number of deaths from measles in hospitalized children under the age of two years

Source: cochrane.org

My dog was so bad that she was walking into walls and skinny from not eating. She's a little under 50 lbs but was closer to 40 lbs. I was sure she was going to die and was trying to get my vet to do the chicken virus treatment.

I gave her 10 8000 IU vitamin A pills with some peanut butter (so she wouldn't spit them out) twice a day for a few days. After about 48 hours, she was looking better and eating. Less than a week later, she was normal again. She now has a facial tick but no other signs of being sick.

If nothing else, the treatment is low cost (about $5 for a bottle of 250 vitamin A pills) and low risk (dogs have no know toxicity level for Vitamin A).

Use my 8000 IU for 40 lbs as a ratio for dogs weighing more or less (i.e. 4 pills for a 20 lb dog and 16 for an 80 lb dog). And give it to them twice a day - once in the morning and once in the evening.

  • vitamin A is toxic in large doses so it is safer to ask your vet BEFORE you start any type of medication in any animal. – trond hansen Sep 14 at 4:36

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